A Special Feature for the Friends of UW Green Bay Viking House

You all are welcome to enjoy this blog which I hope will bring many of you to go and click to be a friend of our wonderful project.

Click and like – https://www.facebook.com/UWGBVikingHouse

Keep scrolling down here for all the fun movies.

Those of you who are already ‘following’ and may have been to events in the past will be pleased to see here a gathering of films and photos of our progress at the house.

Things are Happening at the Viking House.

This beautiful place has been awaiting us for so long. Many have asked and are interested in being actively involved. Of course the world has been in lock-down and the house is a very small part of that.

It is the time to start looking at what we can do to re-celebrate the place; to tidy and renovate and to decorate. We wish also to be able have things happen there.

What is the Viking house? There is a whole series of films and photos here in this blog about our house and our plans. Let us tell you now though that it is a rebuild of a house from that age and is in the grounds of UWGB. The university in Green Bay, Wisconsin is the home of this great feature. The ‘Jarldress’ or perhaps keeper of the house is Professor Heidi Sherman who is head of history for UWGB.

When I say that she is responsible we are talking about a budget-free situation. So anything that happens here is down to our Jarldress to make possible. For us to appreciate.

Who am I? And who are the others in the films below? There are lots of groups and individuals who are willing to take part and to arrange events. The three of us in the films below are volunteers.

I missed the house being open over the summer, for as well as wanting to help out, I miss being the storyteller for the house. Here now I can say I am just a volunteer though acting out of good will. I do happen also to be Professor Sherman’s husband which could be seen as an advantage or a disadvantage. We turn to her for guidance, permission and often for funding.

Trodin Hegn (Dwayne) and Di An are two other active participants with exciting hopes for the future.

Dwayne and I

Our Affiliations

Celebrating the Viking house will be timed nicely with the making of shields. Trodin is making shields for decoration.

Sigourney has designed a UWGB Shield image and we hope to be taking her two of Dwayne’s shields for painting. One with her design, and one with Dwayne’s (Trodin’s) own personal image (Sigourney will this be OK and fit in with your plans? – I would also love to see your other Viking design idea and see if we can use them in some way).

Dwayne and I have plans to invite gifts of shields and flags etc to show affiliations.

Njardarheimr Viking Town, Gudvangen, Norway

A Presentation Day will invite people to visit and make a gift as they walk through. This could be a decoration for the Hall made specially for the day or a ‘blessing token’ selected on the day.

We will have selection of tokens to pick from; simple things such as stones, beads and feathers and we would be glad to hear from people who wish to make or offer decorations suitable for the Viking ages such as tablet weavings or utensils. While arranged outside folks can talk about the donations and the work of others.

There are of course severe restrictions and we will plan within these. IE masks must be worn, people must gather with six feet apart in the area of the Viking house and then parade through the hall slowly with a maximum of ten people in there at any one time. This will include the presenters and hopefully a small film crew.

Six feet apart

(Dress for the weather.)

Example of inappropriate attire

This event is planned to take place on Saturday October 3rd A provisional date. from one o’clock onwards. We will publicise once it is confirmed but for now please ‘pencil’ it in and start thinking ahead. Exciting times.

Let us know that you are interested.

As for those affiliations, this will be groups or festivals which we have connections with. We will be glad to hear from you about connections we have with you. To date we are approaching five different groups we have affiliations with.

As Skald to the Chieftain of Njardarheimr Viking Town in Gudvangen, Norway I will be approaching my chieftain (my blood brother) for a flag of the Njardarheimr symbol. No, I will ask now – Dear Georg is it possible that you could arrange us a flag of the town or a banner for the town for our display? I will be glad to pay if needs be.

Da Boss

I am also a member of The British association The Vikings through their group at York University; Vanaheimr. I am a member of this dynamic group from the university and will be asking them for a flag or banner for us to display. I will ask them now too. Dear Jarl please could you arrange a symbol of our affiliations?

I serve Vanaheimr

I say hi to Tim Jorgenson of Viking Connections, the coordinator of Viking events for The Historical and Cultural Society for Clay County.

Tim I am pleased you are ‘cogitating’ upon the idea of sending us an affiliation item. We will be displaying our pride in connection with River Ravens upon our hall walls in the near future I hope.

I interviewed Tim for a project I was involved in prior to the Covid catastrophe. Here is the interview. Although almost everything was cancelled for all of us in 2020 I am hoping that most of the things mentioned will reappear in a new guise in 2021.

Stop Press – I’ve chatted to Tim and we are saving a space for a shield and he will be making us one especially later in the year.

Hello Adrian,

My present title is “Director of Viking Connection,” although I’m also known as a general coordinator of various Viking events in our region, as well as a hobbyist blacksmith and woodworker. Viking Connection (www.vikingconnection.org) is an outreach program run by the Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County, Minnesota (HCSCC).  We are housed in the Hjemkomst Center, in Moorhead, home of the Gokstad Viking ship replica Hjemkomst, that sailed to Norway in 1982. HCSCC also interprets a Hopperstad Stave Church replica, a reconstruction of the Viking-Age stavkirke still standing in Vik, Norway. Viking Connection is a natural extension of HCSCC’s on-going work to preserve and present Viking-Age folk art in the Midwest.

We invite artists specializing in the Viking Age crafts of Scandinavia to teach and tour in the states of ND, SD, MN, IA, WI, and the UP of MI. We also offer an apprenticeship program to send dedicated students from the Midwest to study their chosen craft with a master artist in Scandinavia. Lastly, we offer a database of international artists interested in networking with each other.

Together with fellow Minnesotan, Kyle Jameson, we started a Viking living history group called, “River Ravens” (www.riverravens.org), largely as a way to have a name for our group when we are hired to provide an encampment, crafts, or entertainment for events in our area. We joined up with UK-based, Regia Anglorum because we really enjoy the authenticity policy they have in place, their research, and their continuous efforts to stay up-to-date with recent archaeological findings. In all, we participate in between 5-10 events annually, the largest being North America’s largest Scandinavian festival, Norsk Høstfest, in Minot, North Dakota.

[Sadly the next paragraph covered plans which were cancelled due to the Covid thing, so I have cut the details, but I am sure there will be another exciting program in 2021 with a Viking skill being brought back to share around festivals and events here. – Ade.]

One of the exciting things to look forward to in 2020, is the Viking Connection apprenticeship. Each year we send a student to Scandinavia to learn from selected artists with the goal of learning new skills or advancing pre-existing skills with a Viking Age craft.

I’m continually being contacted by different organizations interested in creating Viking Age events, or adding a Viking presence to a broader-themed event, so keep an eye on the River Raven’s and VC websites for 2020 opportunities.

Tim

Thank you Tim.

Visit the site for The Historical and Cultural Society for Clay County…

https://www.hcscconline.org/

Here is the River Ravens site…

https://riverravens.org/

We had a wonderful visit to Balagard the Viking age Finland festival in Hancock, Michigan. A great town and a great festival. This is a bi-annual festival so the Covid epidemic probably wont be an effect and then this exciting event will be back in 2021 as planned.

Toby of Balagard was saying to me about the idea of links between groups and how it would be good to have a story linking each shield or item to the group it was from.

I ask now, ‘Hi Toby, can I ask if it is possible to have a shield or item representing your group for our house in Green Bay?’

Here is their FB page – https://www.facebook.com/Balagard-Viking-age-Finland-304102503794434/

The Viking House, University Wisconsin, Green Bay. New era feature.

So yes, my wife Professor Heidi Sherman, as well as being head of history for UWGB, is also the Jarldress for the Viking house. I have never thought of this before, but, wait for it, what does that make me!

Answers on a postcard please.

She has created many events and developments around the house but of course it has all been on hold this year. We are just starting to get the place going again.

There are many who volunteer to help keep the place going and I have been along with a couple of good pals recently to make a start. So here is a feature on the place.

Welcome.

Dwayne is making a shield with his own design on for the display with our collection. We are hoping for donations from other groups and other individuals (you) of samples of their craft.

My groups shield from York University’s Viking group Vanaheimr.

A group planted Hops and I wanted to capture them flourishing so they could see what a good job they had done. Each year they will get more and more prolific.

Raised beds were in lock down.

You can tell the fire pit hasn’t been used in a while.

We need a clear out or a hiding place.

Ideally there shouldn’t be anything modern on view if someone comes to take a photo. The oven needs its cover though to protect all Dwayne’s hard work and we remove it as soon as an activity is preparing.

I can’t wait to get that oven going again and get some cooking done. We are still limited on events of course. Let us look ahead though.

The current wood pile is mainly stuff which was too long for our stove at home, so I guess we will soon get through it and be looking for more.

This is the John

I am thinking we could cut some of the buckthorn to make our little fence out of.

Ah apparently the hawthorn is an invasive so we can cut as much of that as we like.

The box fence is our next project. We are hoping for a bit of help, and to have it finished before the decorations day.

Just down the slope from us is the Frisbee-Golf

The grounds are beautiful

Owen and Elspeth are the lovely couple who made all of this possible.

I haven’t met Harry, but we are all very grateful that he found a way to make a difference to our Viking heritage here at UWGB.

(I would like to know a little more about the cookhouse too)

Maintaining a Viking House can be a Hornet’s nest

We came back again and had a bit of an inspection;

Sorting.

The full team inspection

The Parking situation

UWGB wildlife

After we left today we passed a few Heron, they were standing close to picnickers by the river and I was surprised at how tall they were. I guess at nearly five foot, Dwayne tells me they can reach six foot. The Heron not the Turkeys, or we would be having a good Thanksgiving.

Flax drying will make an interesting addition to the decor.

Then we could process it ready to spin into linen thread.

We have plans for wool too. Insulation.

The return and this time we are equipped.

We needed refreshing.

Refreshments were created by team host Jarldress Sherman

I will catch that frog

Gorrit

Let us be-strim

This is why we were here.

And we got the job done, well Dwayne did.

What’s next boss?

Do follow the Adrian Spendlow blog, and browse the offerings below.

Just a simple blog like this takes me a few days to put together, please do encourage me by clicking the donation button

Saying Thank You

Your donation of $3 will encourage me to continue in my creative efforts.

$3.00

For sale on Bandcamp my amusing yet informative history of the Itchin bridge.

https://adrianspendlow.bandcamp.com/releases

For sale on Amazon my very first book, The Cakes and Tea Collection – a mix of short stories and poetry.

On the US Amazon – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08FP5NLLK

On the UK Amazon – https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B08FP5NLLK

Supporters Club; Dwayne, Adam, Sharon, Sigrun, Holly, Carol, Connie, Spee 69, Oyvind, Ginny, Maureen, Lillian, Margaret, Pam, Lucy, Michelle, Sarah, Obie, and Heather.

Click and like – https://www.facebook.com/UWGBVikingHouse

https://www.facebook.com/oralstories

Facts & Fiction is a quarterly magazine devoted to the art of oral storytelling. On this page you can find and update events and news between issues.

My blog; some Viking shields – https://adrianspendlowblog.com/2020/03/11/some-viking-shields/

Living in America I

Viking Foods – a collection of handy links n chat

Viking Foods – a collection of handy links n chat

I was sent an interesting link and asked for more. Lots of friends sent me information on Viking foodstuffs, so I thought I would put all the links and chats together in one place. I am always glad to hear more.

I pontificate quite a lot so more rigid findings will be found in the links supplied and the future links and information you send me. Here you will find me ruminating like an ungulate.

Trine at Njardarheimr

I asked around about information of foodstuffs and a good friend Leah mentioned hearing of work by the York Archaeological Trust in York, Britain. Lots of bone and poo. Here are couple of things I ‘picked up’ from the conversation. Professor Terry O’Conner of University of York said that cattle were at the heart of daily lives. Although they were quite small compared to contemporary cows they were used for many things, leather, horn, meat, fat, dairy products and of course bone carving.  

For some great bone carving skills, and indeed leather working, do visit Peter Merrett on his Facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/peter.merrett.7

Pete

Old bones is what were found mainly I understand, and this seems to indicate that the cattle were used for labour. They would be hauling things, carts and ploughs and such I guess. Dairy products would also be another reason for keeping the cows longer.

A couple of things came to mind, I would love feedback on these thoughts. Were there young male bones? Did they kill off most of the bulls and keep a few for breeding? Perhaps they hadn’t thought of that. If haulage was so important then bulls or steers would be useful.

I have heard Viking presenters describe the slaughter of animals in the early winter or late fall. They say that you tally up how much animal feed you have for the winter, calculate how many animals that will feed and then work out how many you can keep. So presumably there was a great working of animal materials at this time. Drying and working.

Preservation of food stuff is a thing I would like to hear more about. The communal gathering of wild flora for instance. The ways to keep meat. The equipment used. They must have been a lot of that going on. Where did they get the preservation materials? Lye, smokehouses, salt, vinegar, fermentation, honey boiling. I don’t know but I want to.

They would have course eaten lots of fish. There are remains to show so. I understand millions of oyster shells were found in the Coppergate dig in York. I imagine these were mainly fresh-water oysters. I wonder if they found pearls?

The sea isn’t far away (along the Humber) and Scandinavia isn’t that far away, especially if you think of preserved fish.

Trine Volder

There are two rivers in York. The folks of Jorvik would certainly have noticed them, because they come up to visit you on a regular basis! Eel come to mind, I have seen reconstructions of eel catchers.

Holger’s eel catcher

I have also seen coracles. Again, I want to hear more.

That dig in York found bones of an odd selection of creatures. As well as all the likely suspects when it comes to eating meat and fish there were also birds, frogs and mice bones.

Holger’s pic of Njardarheimr’s chickens

What, I wonder, about the bones of animals which provide fur. There is a controversial thought. They are not mentioned here. Did the Vikings hunt for fur to wear? They traded it yes.

Cooking methods are also pointers, cauldrons, flat stones, griddles possibly, spits and pits.

When it come to the analysis of poo (coprolite?) another surprise food ingredient was discovered. Grit! They ate a lot of that, especially the poor. It got in the flour and wore away the teeth. The teeth were a limitation on life.

Thank you to Fiona for sending me a link to – From Loki to lipids: Using modern biology to discover Viking culture

https://bbsrc.ukri.org/news/fundamental-bioscience/2017/171014-f-using-modern-biology-to-discover-viking-culture/?fbclid=IwAR3Dom5_xqIC8IpXMJWBFjR4UF5BAfFhxRAP5dRdqTJS0lVyQdYUQ4bm_Bc

So the above is looking at, among other things, the residues and fats within utensils. Looking at artefacts to see the logistics of eating.

And an interesting link to Yule in an interview with Dr Ashby…

https://ahrc.ukri.org/research/readwatchlisten/features/festive-food-a-viking-feast-for-yuletide/#:~:text=Dr%20Ashby%20currently%20directs%20the%20AHRC-funded%20project%20Melting,Can%20you%20tell%20us%20a%20little%20about%20yourself%3F

I didn’t notice any reference to alcohol.

I was intrigued by the longstanding connection between Scandinavia and the Arctic.

And here is the Melting Pot site…

https://www.meltingpot.site/

A great links page, and I like their blog the best.

Some other thoughts…

We can also look to the sagas and the stories and poems for pointers.

I hear talk of ballast plants, you fill the ship with stuff to sell, you trade for lighter things, you need ballast. Loads of soil and rock perhaps. This needs emptying out when you get home. So does all the animal waste I guess too. There are seeds in there. Stuff grows. I have been told that oregano grows in Norway because of this factor. So I hear.

Some common-sense thoughts (ramblings).

The placing of settlements, and marker stones point to foodstuffs. What is available in an area and what trade routes could have been established.

The availability of materials. Did the Icelandic people eat rotten food because they didn’t have any trees?

My pal Holger from Germany who I know from working with him in Njardarheimr Viking Town, and his wonderful crafting skills, posted this link to our group chat. This is the piece that got us all talking about other information and links.

https://sciencenorway.no/archaeology-food-viking-age/what-did-the-vikings-really-eat/1706735?fbclid=IwAR3xO_EEyC7AXSpbyowSmMHzC_Dhg3KCMixtOkDNQ60ppt4Llotmo9ZUnf4

Angelica

I can’t help but disagree with the idea that Vikings lived from hand to mouth. You only survive long hard winters if you plan, work hard and work together.

Otherwise it is great.

Sea-leeks is interesting. Odin’s brothers planted them at the beginning of the world! So they must be important.

Mind you, there is also plenty of talk of snakes. Whole pit-fulls. Would that be true?

I would love to see all the veg and herbs we see planted out. The Viking house at Green Bay USA could have a go at a garden from these links in this blog.

Njardarheimr in Gudvangen would be really enhanced by gardens. There is talk here of plots and gardens.

Some of the Gudvangen Vikings hanging out after work.

I am sure I have seen other references to plots and lots. There was mention somewhere of the idea that they improved the land. They must have used compost.

Quite a bit of talk of cultivation too, especially onions.

As for plants Leah mentions someone who is involved in Historic England

https://historicengland.org.uk/

by Chris Evans

Hayley McParland their science advisor. She has written on the findings at the site of the Jorvik Centre ride in York.

The majority of plant finds seem to have been grasses, certainly on a microscopic analysis level; these were most likely oats, rye, wheat, barley and other grain producers. I guess these were mainly for flour, but could also have been for brewing (especially if they found Yarrow?).

Ah, there were lots of archaeobotanical remains which showed the culture, diet and crafts. I don’t have specifics though.

The methods of dying material could be tied back further towards plant cultivation, awareness and gathering.

Dying, Needle-binding and photography by Līga Supantīsaūli Gūlbs

I haven’t so far on this quest discovered any links to medicine, folk-medicine, folklore or beliefs.

Leah suggested that if you were visiting the Jorvik Centre you pre-book a copy of the Jorvik Centre Companion Guide to be waiting for you on arrival. I see you can mail order a copy but it seemed to be way more expensive that way.

Real nice to see a friend in this video for the York Archaeological Trust on our topic of Viking foods.

Viking Food and Cooking with Leoba

Ah thank you Zoe, at last talk of cooperative gathering and preservation.

Beehives?!?

And remember to spit.

It was also nice to see Fiona portraying Wulfruna demonstrating the related topic of pottery.

I have enjoyed spending time with culinary archaeologist Daniel Serra, here is a link to a wonderful book – 

https://www.facebook.com/PastFood/

Please use links above

Let me take you now to University Wisconsin Green Bay’s Viking house.

It was built by the amazing couple Elspeth and Owen Christianson

https://www.uwgb.edu/viking-house/about-owen-and-elspeth/

Do visit the Facebook page for the Viking House which is managed by Jarldress Professor Heidi Sherman-Spendlow with the assistance of Jarldress-in-waiting Mariah, the building skills of Trodin Hegn (Dwayne) and many others.

https://www.facebook.com/UWGBVikingHouse/

The grounds, buildings and events have pretty much been on hold as things have been everywhere.

The future is ahead of us and will blossom deep into the past.

The Society for Creative Anachronism have a group in Green Bay and they are a great bunch of active reenactors of history. They get well involved with the development of ‘the house’.

Now let’s go to amazing star Alda Raven. As well as her work as a singer and creator of Gods Bless Ya! she also hosts the culinary creative Viking Kitchen which features Viking and Vikingesque cookery.

Here is her introductory feature…

And her visit to the Viking Village of Njardarheimr in Gudvangen, Norway where she works with Viking cook Trine Volder.   

We loved dining with the Green Bay group of Sons of Norway. As well as a whole array of wonderful food from Scandinavia they had asked me to bring along a contribution. I realised all was planned so I thought I needed to create a dish no one else would think of; hence – Gas Station Delight!

https://adrianspendlowblog.com/2019/11/23/norwegian-food-with-the-sons-of-norway/

Gas Station Delight

And the wonderful array of delights from Sons of Norway GB…

Here is Trodin’s oven at the Green Bay Viking House…

Then we got the big fire going…

Here Heidi interviews Trodin (Dwayne) as he builds the oven…

He and I cooked up for the wonderfully entertaining Telga Glima…

Now over to Norway to visit the chieftain’s recreated kitchen…

To finish this is not cooking and not just Viking, but this is worth a search for on Facebook; Medieval Makers – re-enacting the medieval daily life; ace site.

That’s episode one of Viking food links and chat.

I am no expert, in fact even worse, I am a storyteller. I am interested, and I am even more interested to hear more. Do please send links and suggestions (Please don’t tell me off).

Saying Thank You

Your donation of $3 will encourage me to continue in my creative efforts.

$3.00

Footage collection with Adrian, friends and family

Footage collection with Adrian, friends and family – Yorkshire Culture, UWGB, Lucy Spendlow, Egg Drop Soup, Frode Tufte, Njardarheimr, Alda’s Viking Kitchen, Lamb Stew, Steam Tales, Daily Distraction, Skipping Day, Scarborough, Georg and the Rooster, Sigrun Design, Alda on Top of the Pops, Real Good Time, Latvian Vikings, Dan Webster Band, Nisswa Viking Festival, Society For Storytelling, Jamie Cooper, Natcha Dauphin.

An audio only set first. I was commissioned by Professor Rebecca Nesvet, Assistant Professor of English at University of Wisconsin, Green Bay to create a presentation on Yorkshire culture. This was recorded by Kate Farley, Instructional Technologist at the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning.

Next I am very proud to show you one of the cookery programs from top chef Lucy Spendlow; Egg Drop Soup.

Here is a visit to the sadly missed Njardarheimr Viking Town in Norway to see our CEO Forde Tufte walking the sheep. I hope we can join you soon. https://youtu.be/TGJBjUIpZII

Alda’s Viking Kitchen presents Lamb Stew.

Snippets from my forthcoming book Steam Tales, written in collaboration with my late father Ronald. This was presented as a ‘daily distraction’ via UW-Green Bay College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. I am proud to be assisted on this publication project by the History team of students while working with Professor Heidi Sherman.

Skipping Day in Scarborough.

My chieftain Georg blesses the God statues while accompanied by the Njardarheimr cockerel.

Top displays at London Fashion Week and very much in demand; Sigrun’s Viking fashions are modelled well, but never as well as now. Here is your chance to see me in my Viking Shirt from sigrun.co.uk

This is Alda with her hit from Top of the Pops revisited

Heidi filmed these two wonderful Vikings from Latvia, Līga Reitere and Zane Danoss, singing to the very essence of nature and the power of the light.

The brilliant Dan Webster Band performing Sand.

The Viking Era Was Brought To Life During First Nisswa Viking Festival, (Nisswa is a city in Crow Wing County, Minnesota) – Thank you to Trodin Hegn for this link…

Members can post events in here, so I guess it is worth a look…

https://www.facebook.com/societyforstorytelling/

Wonderful guy Jamie Cooper with a wonderful rendition of When the Swallows come back to Capistrano

Captivating song from Natacha Dauphin, Je Pars (Poor Patrick). Subscribe to her channel.

.

.

Saying Thank You

Your donation of $3 will encourage me to continue in my creative efforts.

$3.00

Stories and Snippets from my Travels in the US of A

Historically Reenacted Battles, (to the best of my ability)…

I shall be returning to The Norwegian, Rockford, IL, USA for a couple of gigs this spring, and perhaps this isn’t the best example of my work…

Lady Freyja snippet from the Irish club, Green Bay, WI, USA…

Snippet from Veikko’s Quest, as performed at Hostfest, North Dakota, USA…

Veikko’s Quest snippet from University Wisconsin. Green Bay…

Bit more from the Hus…

Dwayne volunteers here feeding the fish, but actually it is a hydroponics bay…

Cujo and Tree’s open mic at Pepper GB in Green Bay USA

Another one from Pepper GB…

And a scary one to finish…

giddy viking by danny

.

.

Saying Thank You

Your donation of $3 will encourage me to continue in my creative efforts.

$3.00

Viking Travel Course – Part Two – Becoming a Viking

Viking Travel Course – Part Two – Becoming a Viking 

Welcome to part two of my personal log of the exciting adventure of being part of the team for the UWGB Viking Travel Course. Yes, this time we will look at Becoming a Viking.

I am supplying links to all things Viking, including links to Njardarheimr Viking Town and all the places of interest along our route.

(Visit UW Green Bay Viking House on Facebook to find out more about the course.)

I am also going to include help on how to dress like a Viking and in particular on making your own clothes. In blog three I will be interviewing my good friend from Viking Connections Tim Jorgensen. He will be telling how we can team up with their Viking Apprentice to learn more about working with Viking fabrics.

You will want to shop around for some things, in particular accessories, so here first are the links for shopping (NB not included in the budget). You can buy materials and patterns, you can commission people, you can acquire jewellery, hats etc; here’s the shop links…

Oh no, first a mention on boots. You might want to buy Viking boots, you might want to wait till you get there and learn how to make your own, but in the mean-time let me tell you that new comers are allowed a little leeway when it comes to authenticity in the footwear department. If you have some simple plain boots which are not too noticeable you will be fine. You can always send us pics for a chat.

Back to apparel links…

Outfit Contacts

We will be hearing from Steph Anderson, the Viking Apprentice for 2020, who is going to be undertaking apparel masterclasses in Sweden and we hope to arrange facetime with her.
Sophia Helen offers ready-made, or patterns, or to be someone to run workshops
Sophia Helen – https://www.facebook.com/waffleandwood/
Toni DB says, if anyone is looking to buy; etsy.com/nineworldsclothing has some nice wool goodies for the Norwegian weather.
etsy.com/nineworldsclothing
https://www.facebook.com/toni.db.7
Leah O’Cuinneagain says, I can send links for patterns, but otherwise I too am happy to make clothes if students would prefer 🙂
Leah coordinates the Viking group for York university and would be happy to help with enquires via – Vanaheim Vikings York on Facebook
She also hand-makes authentic clothing via – https://www.facebook.com/HafurtaskCrafts
Karin Byom – nailbinding for gloves and hats etc, also tablet weaving supplies and happy to advise on all things textile – is based at Njardarheimr and can run courses there – https://www.facebook.com/karin.byom
Ann Asplund says, I’ve got some patterns – what about a skype session where I could help people draft their pattern with their own measurements? Plus with one session helping them take their measurements.
https://www.facebook.com/AnnOther-Day
http://www.annotherday.com/
I am told NilleViking Glæsel has some patterns
https://www.amazon.com/Viking-Clothing-Garment-Nille-Glaesel/dp/1494475227
https://nillegraphic.myportfolio.com/work
http://vikingageclothing.susannabroome.se/booklets/http://vikingageclothing.susannabroome.se/booklets/
vikingageclothing.susannabroome.se
https://www.facebook.com/swanhildassweets/ – for authentic life path jewellery.
Jelling Dragon are very well known for all things Viking – https://jelldragon.com/
Valhallas Silver are a great company – and they visit Njardarheimr – https://www.valhallassilver.com
A search showed up – https://grimfrost.com
Bruni Bear is an expert in nailbinding, she is also an authenticity officer for the BBC – https://www.etsy.com/ca/people/BruniBjarnja – (She is also on Facebook)

We will be learning skills and making things when we are there, and there is a great shop in the village for jewellery etc.

Visiting Vikings – Lots of links Relating to Njardarheimr Viking Town, Gudvangen, Norway
https://www.visitflam.com/activities/the-viking-village-njardarheim/
https://www.visitflam.com/ – top attractions
http://njardarheimr.com/ – including freeman application and guidelines
www.vikingvalley.no/
www.facebook.com/vikingvalley/
https://www.visitnorway.com/listings/viking-village-njardarheimr/200194/
Market footage – https://youtu.be/aB5-lu-lZnU
https://www.facebook.com/njardarheimr/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/gudvangenvikingmarket/
https://www.facebook.com/VisitingVikingValley/
https://thevikingdragon.com/
https://adrianspendlowblog.com
valkyrja.com – Viking blog
A walk around Gudvangen – https://adrianspendlowblog.com/2019/09/03/your-name-in-runes-plus-the-greatest-hits-of-my-gudvangen-commentaries/
Information from my travels –https://adrianspendlowblog.com/2018/12/07/visiting-viking-attractions-an-idea-swap-first-draft/
A 12 blog tutorial on being a storyteller – https://adrianspendlowblog.com/2018/04/01/storytelling-is-1-the-introduction/
A guide to re-enactment – https://adrianspendlowblog.com/2017/10/03/lh-living-history-characterisation-tips-for-re-enactors-2/
A Viking –https://bull-hansen.com/blog/
Slow TV Trip Across Norway – https://thenextweb.com/video/2016/08/04/norway-slow-tv-netflix/
Good, simple, overview of the Vikings in Norway – https://www.visitnorway.com/things-to-do/art-culture/vikings/
Borre and the Midgard Historical Center –
https://www.followthevikings.com/visit/midgard-i-borre
https://vestfoldmuseene.no/en/midgard-viking-centre/visit/
UW Green Bay Viking House – https://www.facebook.com/UWGBVikingHouse/
North Star Vikings is a Minnesota based Viking Age Reenactment group located in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Metro area focusing on the later Viking Age (approx 900 to 1066). – https://www.facebook.com/NorthStarVikings/
Applications and enquiries;
Chat to the team at UWGB for final details, (I am just an assistant) – here’s the email for Professor H Sherman, shermanh@uwgb.edu

And the link to the first blog in this series Viking Travel Course – Part One

.

.

Saying Thank You

Your donation of $3 will encourage me to continue in my creative efforts.

$3.00

Trodin’s Oven and Heidi’s Hus

Trodin’s Oven and Heidi’s Hus – The building of a clay oven on the site of the Viking House at University Wisconsin, Green Bay, United States of America.

Also features, Mariah on beads briefly, Telga Glima the Swedish games group and a snippet of my storytelling.

me n incense 02
Contemplative Moment
incense and lanterns 02
Incense
dwayne base concrete
dwayne base egg
pre tile base
oven base
mq3
hi

Link to Veikko’s Quest

Balagard Festival, Hancock, Michigan

Norske Hostfest, Minot North Dakota

How to do your Name in Runes plus the greatest hits of my films of Gudvangen

Plus a bonus feature: The Day Dwayne Watersealed the Shed, er, I mean Hus…

boards ready
Seating boards waiting for sealant
equip
Spray Gear
roof
Dwayne Does the Roof
ready
Ready
modern viking
Modern Viking
wall spray
Dwayne Vs the Walls
boards
Only 58 more to Lay Out to Spray
door
One Door Done
hus done
Wood Done
dwayne spray
Hip Hip!!!!

.

.

Saying Thank You

Your donation of $3 will encourage me to continue in my creative efforts.

$3.00

Nordic Story Workshop – tips and prompts

Nordic Story Workshop – tips and prompts

nordic bardic

These are handy little prompts if you are wanting to create Viking stories. I was invited along to the Manistique and Wequiock rooms of University Wisconsin – Green Bay by the local wing of the Society of Creative Anachronism to run a workshop. In this activity we thought of aspects of childhood – then what you do is select and imagine they are about grown-up Vikings. Simple statements become something else entirely when you think this way. Try it…

erica skald

Endless energy – Playing checkers – Don’t know their limits – What’s mine is mine – and what’s yours is also mine – Stick weird things in their mouth – Run fast – Capacity to become good beings – Not careful about anything – Hugging kitties – Short attention spans – Always listening – Voluntary insomniacs – Laugh evilly for no reason – Always busy or active – Always destructive – All about them – Doesn’t remember what you just said – Fight their siblings for the sake of fighting – Breaks everything – Selective hearing – Fight siblings – When they ask to see something, they need to hold it – Tries new things – Wild imagination – Balloons – Very perceptive – Inquisitive – Cuddle with mum – Talk incoherently for hours – Hold your hand – Watch with me – What’s your is mine, what’s mine is mine – If it is shiny it is mine – If I see it or touch it, it is mine – If I break it then it’s yours – Make necklaces and jewellery – Very creative – Break down crying – I like blue – Abusive sociopath – Pretending to sleep – Eating lots of yummy stuff – Love – Eat only what you like – Frustrated angry poop face – Ride – Speaks their mind – Constantly learning – Love for destruction – Grounded – Tells tall tales – Great imagination – Roll into the wall – My little pony – Draw on things you shouldn’t…

You can learn further with this blog string; a whole series on being a storyteller – Storytelling is… #1

at the house

UW Green Bay Viking House

v hus

.

.

Saying Thank You

Your donation of $3 will encourage me to continue in my creative efforts.

$3.00